Apprentice. Intern. Slave.

The employment climate for many students and graduates has been a difficult terrain to not only navigate but also survive. And slavery masked under labels of ‘apprentice’ or ‘intern’ only make it worse.

Infographic: The 99% vs. The 1%, www.policyalternatives.ca

Infographic: The 99% vs. The 1%, http://www.policyalternatives.ca

Bogged down with insurmountable student debts, and often forced to take remedial positions to make ends meet, many of this educated generation are enticed by intern or apprentice programs – hoping that their volunteered time could break them into their fields, making them some real money. However, with the rising cost of living most are unable to dedicate much to these mostly unpaid positions, or fall deeper into debt when they do.

The Hollywood Reporter published an article Thursday, outlining a class action suit taken out by many of Hollywood’s unpaid workers against a multitude of movie giants, notably Fox, NBCUniversal and Viacom, with the latter two agreeing to pay their bottom barrel workers. Even millennial darling Lena Dunham came under fire after it became known that her book tour performers were working unpaid. She has since agreed to pay them, but only after a public outcry. A move I find amusingly hypocritical, considering the show that made her a household name often focuses on post graduate employment or lack there of. I thought ‘art’ imitated ‘life’, Ms. Dunham, or is that only when you’re broke?

Here in Canada, the Toronto Star, CBC and even Global News have shed a spotlight on intern financial and even personal rights. And while advocacy groups like the Canadian Intern Association are here to support them, will amending the minimum wage act to include intern and apprentice positions really solve the problem or create a multitude of new ones?

Working for free is not a new concept to me, if I have to hear “I can’t pay you, but it’ll be great for your portfolio” one more time, somebody is getting punched. But the bigger problem is not whether or not interns should be paid at least minimum wage, it’s why there are no paid positions in the first place.

This generation, generation screwed, is the first in modern history to be worse off than the generation preceding it. And yes we can continue to blame an aging population that is draining the pension pot, or a global economy that has shipped jobs over seas, or even the apathy that is assumed so many young workers have towards trade labor. And though these could and I’m sure are contributing factors, it’s the expanding income inequality gap that has screwed us.

As long as the loyalty of big business rests solely with shareholders, layoffs will continue, work hours will grow, employment opportunities will be scarce and “living to work” will be the mantra of the masses. So we can continue our state of denial. We can continue to take slave positions labeled intern or apprentice. We can tell ourselves that what we’re doing will be good for our CV’s and portfolios. Or we can hold the lawmakers accountable for allowing big business to destroy the economy. And demand, that here in Canada, we work to live.

-Parry

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Girl Posts Selfie – Internet Retaliates

If you took any history 101 class, you may have heard of civil rights activist, and overall great guy, Martin Luther King, Jr.. And if you happened to be awake during your teacher’s lesson, you may have retained some of the brilliant and moving words Dr. King spoke, particularly his speech that included living “in a nation” that judges a person by the “content of their character”. And though these words were taken from a speech promoting civil rights and condemning racial segregation, being judged by the content of one’s character is apparently an ideal the internet has no coding for.

A friend of mine, like myself, and many people I know, finished a well earned degree and decided to travel abroad. She chose to teach English on the colorful shores and at times eccentric country of South Korea. New sights, sounds, smells and tastes were and continue to be exciting, scary and sometimes humorous all of which she has shared through, you guessed it, social media. Little did she know that sharing beyond her circle would mean opening herself up to an onslaught of superficial, misogynistic and downright cruel commentary.i5cKPM0

An innocent post on reddit, sharing the comedic value of translated English grammar, sent many users on a tirade, one such user suggesting that she take a picture “of the fucking hat not yourself you attention whore”. While others criticized her appearance, including a paragraph detailing what was physically ‘wrong’ with her. Though some users found the humor in the original post, and a few others came to her defense, many of the comments focused mainly on her physicality in negative and even derogative ways. But wasn’t the post about a hat?

The internet has a life of its own. I am not so ignorant to not see or accept, that as an entity, it cannot be policed in the same way a physical life is. But is it too much to ask that the few civilities that remain in our analogue world, also exist in a digital one? I have judged many a person’s looks – made a snide comment about a stranger to a friend, or expressed a dislike for a celebrity based purely of their appearance. We all have. The difference is, I have never done so within earshot, or in this case, text-shot, of the subject I’ve criticized. I couldn’t imagine walking up to a stranger just to question if they’ve had “botched cosmetic surgery” or if they’re “ an alien with a human skin mask”.

Anonymity online has its benefits; it allows groups and individuals to express their feelings, opinions, and even hardships, without fear of retribution. However that same anonymity can also be severely detrimental. As one reddit commentator said “I’m using the anonymity of the internet to do whatever I want. Why bother lying and saying she looks good when I can be straight up and tell her she has a messed up face”. Well, I can tell you why @Slappin_hoes, because it’s cruel for no other reason than being cruel.

I’m not an optimistic idealist, there will always be a level of nastiness in any arena, but the abundance of superficial malice online is unnecessary, and really, just pathetic. An uninvited sadist gets his/her pleasure from the pain and suffering of his/her victim, and we as a society condemn them for it. But verbal savagery continues to breed in forums and threads without consequence. And I wonder, has the freedom of anonymity become a cancer preventing us from being our online selves, or has it illuminated who we really are – detached and callous predators.

-Parry

Home Is Where the Toque Is

It has been far too long since I’ve written anything, as we know, life can get in the way, and it sure doesn’t give a damn about your plans. Nonetheless, I’ve finally returned to good ol’ Canadian soil, and (gladly) left the suffocating smog of Beijing.

Travel has been a huge part of my identity for the last five years, and I have had the opportunity to explore and immerse myself in several Asian countries and even a couple of European ones. I’ve met some amazing people and developed some lasting friendships along the way, but there is really no place like home.

Canada is my homeland, and I wouldn’t go insofar as to say I’m proud to be Canadian – after all what does that really mean? Still, I am delighted my passport carries that reassuring coat of arms, as we canucks really do receive a certain hospitality abroad. Nevertheless, like with any home, it requires maintenance and even some upgrading now and then.

Now, don’t get your under things in a bunch, I know it is a privilege to live here, to be a national. Canada has one of the strongest banking systems in the world; we have public healthcare, and an abundance of natural resources. We are welcomed warmly the world over, and pollution masks, are not an accessory we require. Canada is a great country, but I’ve never been satisfied with ‘great’, especially when I know ‘better’ is within reach.

My comparisons of Canada to places like Norway, Denmark, Sweden and even the Netherlands – countries who have truly embraced a socially responsible ideal – have been a common utterance of mine. But each time the suggestion arises that we have the potential to be as socially liberal, and environmentally conscious, I’m countered with, “(blank) is a small country, and establishing (blank) would not be possible here, Canada is too big”. Well that is some defeatism if I’ve ever heard it. If you can’t find the solution, you haven’t looked hard enough.

There is no reason Canada cannot establish an affordable and fuel efficient rail system, establish limits on urban sprawl, offer affordable post secondary education, build vertical farms, or even implement bicycle friendly cities. The solution for being better than great lies in the cure for the apathy that hinders it. We are the Great White North, but its damn time we find a new adjective, eh?

-Parry